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November 27, 2000

Premium Wines Traded Via Global Online Exchange

Multi-Currency Trading Available

Uvine, a global exchange for trading premium wines, has been launched in the U.S. following a successful European introduction in May. Uvine's marketplace provides an anonymous, neutral, and secure trading floor for wine enthusiasts to buy and sell the most sought-after wines in the world, plus invest in and manage prestigious wine portfolios much as they would shares of stocks.

The global premium wine category was worth $45 billion in 1999, and is growing at an annual rate of 6.5% since 1975. In the U.S. market, California luxury wines ($25+ per bottle) and trophy wines ($50+ per bottle) are growing at 20% per year.

Uvine is the only wine exchange offering multi-currency trading... currently compatible with 20 currencies. (No barter currencies are yet accepted, but with the growth and consolidation of the industry worldwide, future possibilities exist.)

Uvine (www.uvine.com) offers a low, 3.5% exchange fee for traders. Merchants and brokers typically charge buyers between 10% and 35%; traditional auction houses command those fees from both buyers and sellers. Even existing online wine traders charge between 5% and 12.5% on either side of a transaction.

Uvine's U.S. headquarters are in Larkspur, California, a convenient location between the world-renowned Napa Valley, the San Francisco Bay Area, and Silicon Valley.


Changing Advertising World Embraces Barter To Secure Ownership Rights

Historically, advertising agencies haven't claimed ownership rights to the intellectual properties created for clients, because they received a 15% commission on every dollar their client spent for TV time or space in magazines and newspapers.

In addition they profited from the awards, awareness, and acknowledgment of their work. But with compensation shrinking, ad shops are beginning to assert ownership over their creative endeavors.

In short, the 15% commission is gone, so now agencies are moving to claim a piece of the action of their creations...in the form of licensing revenue generated from advertising characters and slogans.

Under the recent TBWA Chiat/Day contract with Pets.com, the agency will receive some revenue related to licensing of Sock Puppet for key chains, coffee mugs, books, greeting cards, toys, and other items. Although the agency won't receive any money from the sale of Pets.com.

Some advertising executives say such sharing of ownership rights is long overdue, because the agencies have created enormous value in some icons--a value far beyond the advertising commissions generated. One such example is "Got milk?"


Travel Can Save Your Marriage

According to Lenore Terr, medical doctor and clinical professor at the University of California-San Francisco, an important enemy of any relationship is boredom--being boring, thinking your partner is boring, and boringly plodding on.

That's where play comes in--play, and you cease being boring to one another claims Terr, author of Beyond Love and Work: Why Adults Need To Play. "The tremendous advantage of travel is that you can play, and you have all day long to have fun," she says. Plus you just might come to recognize how much marriage and travel have in common.

"Travel is almost always an adventure, and it can restore the sense of adventure to your relationship," concurs Leon Kass, M.D. and co-author of a book on courting and marriage. "Married life is like a grand adventure, and what you've done is chosen somebody to accompany you on the journey that is your life."

Contact your local trade exchange for your travel needs.


Here And There. . .

  • The biggest U.S. companies aren't rushing to spend advertising dollars on the World Wide Web, according to AdZone Interactive, which tracks ads on 1,300 web sites. Of the estimated $1.6 billion spent in the month of September on internet advertising, the top ten Fortune 500 companies contributed less than $50 million. General Motors, No. 1 on the Fortune list, spent an estimated$10.5 million on web ads, while No. 2 Wal-Mart spent nothing.

  • Anyone watching daytime television--the daily talk show's of Oprah Winfrey and Rosie O'Donnell--see the famous hosts mentioning products, which are a form of barter. Because in most cases the shows give some sort of "promotional consideration," verbal or written on-air credit, in exchange for the mentioned products, i.e. hotel rooms, airfare or other payments, which are provided to the show.

  • E-commerce provider iMerchant has struck a barter agreement with Intel that gives them access to the newest Intel technology, introductions to Intel's regional customer base, and the prestige of association with the giant semiconductor manufacturer.

    In return iMerchant will encourage its online customers to adopt Intel's products and standards. The exchange follows a pattern of "no cash" agreements between Intel and smaller internet concerns around the world.

  • Worldcom and Global TeleMedia International have completed a bartered resolution of the debt and litigation between the companies. Worldcom has canceled litigation in exchange for warrants equal to 3.2%, or 500,000 shares, of Global's stock.

  • SmartBargains.com thinks the idea of delivering bargains online will be a winner. The new site is the online arm of the 97-year-old liquidation firm Gordon Brothers Group. Plus having AOL as an investor, which will feature it on a "bargains page," should make customer acquisition very inexpensive.

  • "Quid pro quo," a form of barter, is being used more and more in venture investing. Succinctly, manufacturers of computers will make direct investments in high-tech start-up companies when the start-up commits to buying computer systems and services from the manufacturer/venture investor.

  • Two Rider University students are co-founders of TradingTix. It hopes to be the meeting place to buy, sell, or barter event tickets for over 200 different types of events. Sellers can list their tickets in classified ads or auction them off. The site also holds a weekly $1 million drawing. Winners may use the million toward any fees incurred in TradingTix.com auctions.

 

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